Belfast in the Civil War: Army of the Potomac

May 01, 2014

Local and Legendary: Belfast in the Civil War

April 29, 1864

“The great movement of the Army of the Potomac is about to begin, if we may trust the signs. The plans of General Grant, however, can be only conjectured, as everything relating to them is strictly guarded. But the movement of Burnside’s corps to Washington for embarkation looks much like a movement towards Richmond by water, probably for an attack from the south side in conjunction with an advance overland. But whatever may be the combinations, there is no doubt that the time is near at hand for the most terrible struggle of the war, which will sprinkle anew with blood the thrice saturated soil of Virginia.”

“The slaves of the border states have been enrolled and are to be drafted from.”

April 28, 1904

“Capt. E. H. Colby arrived last Saturday noon in his smack Daybreak with 1,800 pounds of live fish. The catch only included four or five haddock. Since leaving here on his last trip the weather has been very unfavorable for fishing, two snow storms and generally rough weather having been encountered. This trip was got off Seal Island. Mrs. Colby is now visiting relatives in Belfast and will go to their home in Sunset, Deer Isle, on the next trip of the Daybreak.”

“The coming attractions at the Belfast Opera House are Prof. Prescelle, the hypnotist, and George F. Hall in ‘A Ragged Hero’ – a play which unfolds an interesting story of love and adventure. Further particulars later.”

April 29, 1943

Ice Leaves Swan Lake Saturday Morning, April 24

“After a long winter’s wait – while fishing yarns of tall lengths were being spun by the Isaac Waltons of Waldo County – the ice went out of Swan Lake Saturday, April 24. Out of nowhere appeared fishermen, young and old, to try their luck with rod and reel. We have all exclaimed over the cold, late Spring; but in checking over a record of Norman Read we find that since 1891 the ice has left Swan Lake later than April 24 fourteen years, five years of which have been in May.”

Playing at the Colonial Theatre: Gene Autry with Smiley Burnette in “Ride, Tenderfoot, Ride,” plus “Wrecking Crew” starring Richard Arlen, Chester Morris and Jean Parker.

April 27 1972

“Sears Roebuck & Co. recently announced the appointment of Edward C. Elwell as the authorized sales merchant for Belfast. Coinciding with Elwell’s appointment is the relocation of the Sears Belfast branch from the Belfast Shopping Center to 60 Main Street in the downtown business district.”

Lady Busdriver Retires

“Carrie Cross, a familiar face through the years for hundreds of school children, is retiring from her job as school bus driver at the end of this year. Mrs. Cross has been driving children to and from school for the past 20 years, starting with a station wagon and gradually increasing the size of the vehicles.”

Children’s Author Speaks

“Mary Jane, well know writer of mysteries for children, was visiting her young friends at the Belfast Free Library last week. Mary Jane, originally from Massachusetts, moved here with her husband 35 years ago and presently lives in Newcastle. She is now awaiting the publication of her seventeenth novel. Most of the popular series for young readers are set in Maine towns.”

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