School scoop — Recognition, duct tape and gratitude

By Mariah Albanese | Dec 20, 2012
Source: File image

Let's have a big hand for the students of quarter one

Students and teachers in Searsport District High School round off each quarter of learning and intense studying with a celebration of awards in the school cafeteria. Congratulations to students of quarter one — Lilah Chaar, Alex Carroll and Kaitlyn Robinson. People may think academic success is top priority to be a student of the quarter. These students may have some nice grades, but what matters most is how they treat their peers and the community around them. The three main requirements teachers look for are work ethic, citizenship and consistency. Things like attendance, role modeling, turning homework in on time, helping others in the school and community, and high achievement are important, too, and in at least one academic area, all of these students excel in these categories. These students are good representatives of their grade levels at SDHS. Be sure to congratulate them.

Quack!

Inspired by duckbrand.com, students and SDHS Library Assistant Ann Marshall are starting what could be the new famous duct tape club. Nothing is quite finalized yet, but it sounds very fascinating. Marshall and I talked for almost 20 minutes into my next class about duct tape wallets, prom dresses and which crazy patterns we liked.

Upcoming will be a whole feature on duct tape. It will also be my first feature, so stay tuned!

Historic roots

The “Research Rubric” teachers use to grade students' work at SDHS is not their own creation. For students like me, who never take the time to read the copyright at the bottom, this rubric was actually adapted with permission from Londonderry High School in New Hampshire back in 2007. Mrs. Charlene Knox Farris, the official historian of Searsport and a substitute teacher at SDHS, said the first settlers in the Belfast and Searsport area came from Londonderry, N.H., in 1770. What a coincidence she discovered!

Giving thanks for Christmas

There are a few people I would like to thank for making this month of December wonderful for me:

First of all, I would like to thank Tanya Mitchell for helping me this far in my internship. I am having a lot of fun, and learning a lot about myself and my writings. I would also like to thank everyone at The Republican Journal for giving me this column space. I am looking forward to meeting you guys.

Mrs. Charlene Knox Farris, thank you for recognizing me on the editorial page. I am glad you are enjoying my columns. You are also a big help in giving my columns more interesting topics to write about.

To the RSU 20 district staff, I am flattered that so many schools would like some press recognition. I apologize to those I haven't been able to contact yet, but I have not forgotten about you. I have a sticky note on my laptop with schools I need to contact. I will be in search of more events in January, after I take care of my next one at Belfast Area High School. Be sure to email me, and thank you so much — I couldn't have done it without you guys.

There is one special person I am blessed to have met this month. I just want you to know, you have made my entire Christmas. You know who you are.

Column blog

I am not as much of a talker as I am a writer. Tanya is totally right when she tells me that there is a difference in interviewing someone I know versus someone I don't know. However, I love people and enjoy talking when I can think of things to say. Despite my silent social life, at home I am a crazy girl. One of my previous columns was called “When normal doesn't fit” and that title doesn't just describe psychological characteristics.

I was looking up unjust laws the other day in school (so it's school-related). I found a pretty awkwardly written website, but what people think are unjust laws I could most certainly agree with. What do you guys think about needing licenses to sell lemonade, only downloading music that you own, jaywalking, driving with a rejected inspection sticker, showering before using a public pool, “Don't read something in a bookstore if you're not going to buy it,” and no home gambling?

I hope you liked this week's “column blog”. I will write them when I feel up to it. Happy holidays, everyone!

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