There were no lobsters to be harvested from mid-morning to mid-afternoon July 10 in Searsport Harbor because many of the boats used to do that work were traveling much to fast. In fact, catching lobsters was the last thing on most of the captains minds as they had engines to roar and wakes to create.

Thus was the scene July 10 as Searsport hosted one of the latest in a series of events by the Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association.

There were different classes for each race, starting with the boats being separated by diesel class and gasoline class. Then each group was broken down by boat length and horsepower.

The event was the fourth in a series of weekend races that began in Boothbay Harbor June 19 and will culminate Sunday, Aug. 22 in Portland. There were also lobster boat races held June 20 in Rockland, July 3 in Jonesport and July 11 in Stonington.

Upcoming races will be in Friendship, Harpswell, Winter Harbor and Pemaquid.

On July 10 in Searsport, the warm weather was overcast with intermittent showers. The water was slightly choppy.

The fastest lobster boat on the day was Starlight Express raced by Alfred Osgood out of Vinalhaven. Foolish Pleasure out of Beals was the winner last year.

Starlight Express definitely won the day with their performance and that [boat] is a work of art,” said captain Travis Otis, vice president of the Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association. “It’s just a joy to watch.”

The individual results for the 25 races in the different classes were:

Work boats shorter than 24 feet

Race 1 — Class A skiffs 16-feet and shorter with outboards up to 30 hp, operator ages 18 years and younger: 1, Baby Baron raced by Gavin Holland.

Race 2 — Class B inboards, outboards or outdrives, 31 to 90 hp: 1, Valkyrie raced by Ed Upham; and 2, Full Throttle raced by Colyn Rich.

Race 3 — Class C inboards, outboards or outdrives, 91 hp and up: 1, Eastern raced by Nick Dakin.

Gas powered work boats 24 feet and longer

Race 4 — Gasoline Class A, 4- and 6-cylinder 24 feet and longer: 1, Cry Baby raced by D. & L. Boatworks.

Race 5 — Gasoline Class B, V-8 up to 375 cid, 24 feet and longer: 1, Linda Carol raced by Chris Smith; and 2, Frosty Pumpkin raced by Walter Rich.

Race 6 — Gasoline Class C, V8, 376 to 502 cid, 28 feet and longer: 1, Black Diamond raced by Randy Durkee.

Race 7 — Gasoline Class D, V-8, Over 502 cid, 28 feet and longer: 1, Foolish Pleasure raced by Galen Alley.

Diesel powered work boats 24 feet and longer

Race 8 — Diesel Class A, up to 235 hp, 24 to 31 feet: No entrants.

Race 9 — Diesel Class B, up to 235 hp, 32 feet and longer: No entrants.

Race 10 — Diesel Class C, 236 to 335 hp, 24 to 33 feet: 1, Venom raced by David Grant.

Race 11 — Diesel Class D, 236 to 335 hp, 34 feet and longer: 1, Pisscuttah II raced by Cory Robertson; and 2, Rich Returns raced by Wayne Rich.

Race 12 — Diesel Class E 336 to 435 hp, 24 to 33 feet: 1, General II raced by Bryant Ciomei.

Race 13 — Diesel Class F, 336 to 435 hp, 34 feet and longer: 1, Ms. Rose raced by Ed Torosian; 2, Double G raced by Bill Grant; and 3, Hee Haw raced by Brent Davis.

Race 14 — Diesel Class G, 436 to 550 hp, 28 to 35 feet: 1, Seacock raced by Todd Ritchie.

Race 15 — Diesel Class H, 436 to 550 hp, 36 feet and longer: 1, First Team raced by Travis Otis; and 2, Askk’n raced by Ed Shirley.

Race 16 — Diesel Class I, 551 to 700 hp, 28 to 35 feet: No entrants.

Race 17 — Diesel Class J, 551 to 700 hp, 36 feet and longer: 1, Janice Elaine raced by David Myrick.

Race 18 — Diesel Class K, 701 to 900 hp, 28 feet and longer: No entrants.

Race 19 — Diesel Class L, 901 hp, 28 feet and longer: 1, Starlight Express raced by Alfred Osgood.

Race 20 — Diesel Class M, 40 feet and longer, up to 750 hp: 1, 51 raced by Billy Bob Faulkingham; 2, Gramp’s Bird raced by Patrick Faulkingham; and 3, Sari Ann raced by Vance Bunker.

Race 21 — Diesel Class N, 40 feet and longer, 750 hp and over: 1, Abigail & Carter raced by Chris Page.

Race 22 — Gasoline Free for All: 1, Black Diamond raced by Randy Durkee; 2, Linda Carol raced by Chris Smith; 3, Frosty Pumpkin raced by Walter Rich; and 4, Cry Baby raced by D. & L. Boatworks.

Race 23 — Diesel Free for All: 1, Starlight Express raced by Alfred Osgood; 2, Seacock raced by Todd Ritchie; 3, Janice Elaine raced by David Myrick; 4, Abigail & Carter raced by Chris Page; and 5, 51 raced Billy Bob Faulkingham.

Race 24 — Woodenboat: 1, Abigail & Carter raced by Chris Page; 2, Sari Ann raced by Vance Bunker; and 3, Rich Returns raced by Wayne Rich.

Race 25 — Fastest Lobster Boat: 1, Starlight Express raced by Alfred Osgood; 2, Abigail & Carter raced by Chris Page; 3, 51 raced by Billy Bob Faulkingham; and 4, Black Diamond raced by Lindsay Durkee.

Nick Dakin, 25, competed in the Searsport races. He has been racing about eight years. He said he recently put his boat in the water and competes “just for the fun.” Asked his favorite part of the event, he said, “Just getting together and having a good time.”

Travis Otis and his dad Keith Otis again were instrumental in organizing this year’s Searsport races. Travis is vice president of the Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association and Keith is head chairman of the Searsport Lobster Boat Races. Travis has organized Searsport races with his dad since 2002, but the Searsport races have been going on for 15 years or more.

Travis said last year held good weather for the race but the afternoon was rough. The trip to the next race, the next day, in Stonington was “eventful,” he said.

“This year [the water] was a little rougher during the race but after the race it was better for those traveling to the next race,” Travis said. “The races went very well. The weather played a big part in the participation of it. We had fewer number of boats than we would have preferred, but its understandable.”

The weather forecast was for severe thundershowers, which could have kept some from attending, he said. There were 25 boats this year and 32 last year.

“The competitions went well,” Travis said. “Definitely, had we had more participants it would have been fuller in some of the classes.”

A handful of classes that had single or double entries were combined into classes to make it work.

“This represents an interesting challenge for some because now you are racing boats that you normally don’t encounter in your classes,” Travis said. “So, you know, testosterone flares and everybody gets a little antsy and they want to make sure that they can beat the next guy even if he is not in their class. Overall, racing, it adds a little bit of flavor.”

Travis said the highlight of this year’s event was “not having any incidents. Last year we did have an incident and a racer was ejected out of his boat. This year we did not have that so that was definitely the highlight: getting to the end of it without having anybody injured.”

Travis said watching  the “free for alls” when the best boats race against one another is always exciting.

“Overall it was fun,” Travis said. “It was a good family atmosphere we feel and it’s just a good time.”

He added that the viewers from the shore were out in force. “It’s a progression. People see these things, then they get the racing bug, then they go and enter, then they get a little bit more, then they win, well, now they are hooked.”

For more information about the Maine Lobster Boat Races, visit the website lobsterboatracing.com.

VillageSoup sports staff can be reached by phone at 207-594-4401 or by e-mail at sports@villagesoup.com.