A Searsport man who formerly worked at two area elementary schools was indicted again by a Waldo County Grand Jury on 18 charges of possession of sexually explicit materials this week.

Travis Rowe, 24, of Searsport was among 54 people indicted by a grand jury during its latest session.

Rowe was arrested last September after detectives with the Maine State Police Computer Crimes Unit, through the assistance of the Maine Attorney General’s Office, executed a search warrant at Rowe’s Searsport residence. That investigation resulted in police seizing several computers, including a laptop, which MSP Computer Crimes Unit Detective Mike McFadden said contained “several videos that were child pornography in nature.” The children depicted in the videos, said McFadden, were under the age of 12.

At the time of Rowe’s arrest, McFadden said the videos did not appear to depict any local children.

Rowe, who was employed as a computer technician at elementary schools in Hope and Appleton, reportedly resigned his position shortly after his arrest. He has been free on $1,000 cash bail since his arrest. As part of his bail conditions Rowe is barred from using the Internet and cannot have contact with anyone under the age of 16.

In February, Rowe was indicted on 19 counts of possession of sexually explicit materials.

Waldo County Deputy District Attorney Eric Walker said the grand jury’s latest indictments in Rowe’s case are representative of the same charges Rowe originally faced when he was detained last fall. The difference, Walker said, is that each of the counts that the grand jury considered in the most recent session spelled out, in more specific terms, the nature of the materials that Rowe allegedly possessed at the time of his arrest.

McFadden said Rowe’s defense attorney, Peter Rodway of Portland, had previously raised concerns about the fact that the indictments against his client were “not specific regarding which charge went with which video or image.”

McFadden said due to that development, Walker dismissed the original indictment and re-indicted Rowe, but this time each of the counts are more specific to the nature of materials that Rowe allegedly possessed on his computer.

The matter had not been presented to a judge for a formal ruling, said McFadden, so he has no way of knowing if the concerns raised by the defense were indeed valid enough to constitute Walker’s re-submission of the case to the grand jury. If a judge had ruled that the state needed to be more specific, McFadden said, Walker would still have re-submitted the case just as he did in this week’s grand jury session.