Unity College has announced two additions to its staff and faculty.

Jennifer deHart has been appointed sustainability director, a new staff post created to keep Unity "at the forefront of applied environmental learning and sustainability," according to college President Stephen Mulkey.

Unity, "America's environmental college," is considered to be a national leader in sustainability science and education.

Fernando Nájera, a scholar with international research experience in animal care and conservation, joins Unity's faculty as assistant professor of captive wildlife care and education.

DeHart

DeHart has led sustainability efforts for a number of educational institutions, including, most recently, Virginia Military Institute and Harvard. In her new post, she will work with college staff, administration, faculty and students to plan, develop and facilitate coordinated, best-practice sustainability efforts.

DeHart holds an M.S. degree in facilities management from Massachusetts Maritime Academy, an M.A. in teaching from Johns Hopkins University; and a B.A. in Biology from Swarthmore College.

She has served as an industrial program associate for the Consortium for Energy Efficiency in Boston and as a teacher in the Baltimore city and county school systems. She is certified in the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) program, accredited by the Green Building Council, and is an energy manager in the Association of Energy Engineers.

Nájera

Nájera joins Unity College's wildlife faculty, where he will teach and be a mentor to students, applying his experience in training biology and veterinary students in techniques related to wildlife medicine, research and management.

Nájera recently completed an internship in exotics, wildlife and zoological medicine at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences at Oklahoma State University.

He holds a degree in veterinary medicine and a Master of Science degree in veterinary clinical ethology and animal welfare, both from the Complutense University of Madrid. His Ph.D. study has focused on the veterinary aspects of conservation programs in Southeast Asian wild felids (cats).

Nájera has worked as principal researcher in the Bornean Wild Cats Veterinary Project and veterinary adviser for the Bornean Clouded Leopard Programme with the University of Oxford and Complutense University in Madrid, in Sabah, Malaysia. He also has a veterinarian for zoos in Spain and worked in wildlife rescue and rehabilitation centers in Ecuador.