Maine’s highest court ruled Tuesday that opponents of ranked-choice voting had failed to collect enough signatures to trigger another statewide referendum, opening the door for the first-ever use of the process in a presidential election.

The Maine Supreme Judicial Court overturned a lower court ruling that would have blocked the use of ranked-choice voting in the presidential contest on Nov. 3. Instead, the state Supreme Court agreed that the Maine Secretary of State’s Office was justified in invalidating roughly 1,000 petition signatures submitted by the groups challenging ranked-choice voting in a presidential race.

As a result, the groups failed to submit enough signatures to trigger a “people’s veto” referendum this November on the use of ranked-choice voting in a presidential election.

The high court’s ruling on Tuesday effectively means that Maine voters will be able to rank the presidential candidates in order of preference, absent any other legal developments.