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567-8067

Doctor retires

Stockton Springs Health Center has announced the retirement of Dr. Richard Read, primary care physician, as of March 31. Drs. Bernadette Stevenson and Daphne Lang and Nurse Practitioner Mary Elsa Theobold will continue to give us outstanding medical care here in town. We will miss Dr. Read’s presence at the Health Center.

Gov. Janet Mills has announced that all Mainers over age 70 will be scheduled for the COVID vaccine over the next two weeks.

Town Office

The next Select Board meeting is scheduled for Jan. 21 at 8 a.m. Trash is picked up curbside every Friday and must be out by 7 a.m. Recycling is on January 28 and e-waste will be on Saturday, Jan. 30, from 9 a.m. until noon.

Community Library

With the number of COVID-19 cases up again, the library wants to remind patrons that it offers curbside service. If there is a book or movie that you are interested in or perhaps some suggestions from the volunteers, please call 567-4147.

Condolences go out to the family of Cynthia Wells, a longtime resident of Stockton Springs. Donations may be made to the Stockton Springs Fire and Ambulance at 217 Main St.

The Stockton Harbor Yacht Club has moved out of the building by the docks and will be headquartered somewhere to be determined.

It is always fun in the summer to watch the many boats in our harbor going in and out. Fort Point State Park, on the other side of Cape Jellison, was opened in 1974 and included the Fort Point Lighthouse, which was built in 1836 to aid mariners going up and down the Penobscot River to Bangor and Castine.

The lighthouse was the first river lighthouse built in Maine. The station’s light, a fourth-order Fresnel lens with a 250-watt halogen bulb, is 88 feet above sea level and visible for more than 10 miles. It was manned by civilians employed by the U.S. Lighthouse Establishment for many years before the Coast Guard took it over in 1957.

Also in the park is Fort Pownall. In May 1759, Gov. Pownall of Massachusetts brought 400 men to build Fort Pownall. The fort’s large central blockhouse had four bastions and was surrounded by a palisade, ditch, and large earthen bank, all shaped like a four-point star. One can still see the ditches that were part of the fort to this day.

The park is still a great place to visit at any time of year, even though the road is closed in the winter. Many people cross country ski or snowshoe the road if there is snow on it, and if no snow, then walking the road is a quiet, enjoyable outing.

Thought for the week: “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.” — The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.