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Big cat makes big news

Mountain lions in Frankfort, Maine? You bet. Last week, my neighbor witnessed a cougar, or mountain lion, crossing Loggin Road by my house. This was early in the morning, before traffic had fully ramped up for the day.

This wasn’t the first instance of a mountain lion in the area. Several weeks ago, a friend mentioned that something had dug a large hole in the side of a bank at his family’s place in Prospect. He wondered if a bear were the digger, but bears usually aren’t energetic enough to dig a den. Bears are just as happy to spend the winter beneath a pile of brush or in a small cave or some similar natural object. It never occurred to me that a mountain lion might be the culprit.

And then I got a report of a man who saw a lion alongside the road in Prospect, just last week. Then it all came together.

Mountain lions have a huge range and may not show up in these parts for months, if ever. On the other hand, Frankfort’s mountains and valleys represent excellent lion habitat and it is possible that people are seeing resident cats. Either way, there is sufficient anecdotal evidence to convince me that Frankfort is home, at least for the moment, to a mountain lion.

Under the feeder

Speaking of cats reminds me of birds. I am pleased to report that two young cardinals, male and female, have begun visiting my seed feeder. The youngsters aren’t quite as colorful as their parents, but that should soon change. It’s such a pleasure for me to watch these, to me, exotic birds.

Other regular visitors include black-capped chickadees, tufted titmice, common nuthatches and hairy woodpeckers.

Waldo Peirce Reading Room

Up until now, I hadn’t realized that the Waldo Peirce Reading Room, Frankfort’s great little library, has DVDs to loan. I was given a Blue-Ray player for my birthday and now I find that the library has lots of movies to keep me entertained.

Also, for those with specialized tastes (I, for example, love history books on the American Revolution as well as the Indian wars), the library can order just about any book you might want.

History note

The Bangor Daily of Feb. 3, 1911, reports that the U.S. Census for 1910 shows that Frankfort had a population of 1,157. This was down from the 1,211 count of 1900, but up slightly from the 1,099 of 1890.

Weekly quote

“The biggest danger in getting lost is the normal tendency to panic.” — Clyde Ormond