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It was a rough week for me. A form of the flu-type virus I contracted early this summer came back to bite me and it was quite debilitating. I am on the mend, but still not my old self. Nothing lasts forever, though, and I hope to be walking over Frankfort’s hills and mountains, shotgun in hand, come October.

The recent cold snap has really hit me in a strange way. Cooler-than-normal nighttime temperatures have made it seem unusually cold. The problem is, it was too cold for comfort, but not cold enough to trigger the heat to run full-tilt, as in winter.

I’m not the only one who has noticed this, either. Others have reported the same problem.

Also, our bodies haven’t yet become attuned to cooler temperatures. We have gone from sizzling summer heat to cool fall temperatures, with little time to acclimate. Soon, we’ll consider temperatures in the 40s balmy instead of chilly.

In the garden

I picked all the remaining tomatoes from my one, paste-style tomato plant. All in all, this one Roma plant yielded a good half-bushel of fruit. I picked many green tomatoes and placed them in the crisper drawer of the fridge. There, they won’t ripen, and will be ready to make fried-green tomatoes any time I want.

My Serengeti green beans just keep pumping and continue to give several meals worth of beans each week. Also, these retain their long, slender shape, unlike so many other bean types.

My winter squash didn’t do well because of being planted in a too-shady location. I’m still learning about where and when different spots get the best amount of sun.

To compensate for this, I bought all the squash I needed at local farmstands. I suggest others do the same, rather than waiting for the first frost for inspiration. If frost so much as kisses a winter squash, it will quickly rot. So get yours now, before that happens.

Weekly quote

“The noblest revenge is to forgive.” — Thomas Fuller