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  • Published
    April 25, 2019

    Remember the Alamo: Walls work

    Imagine if you will: Your name is Taylor and you work for the Border Patrol, stationed in the Rio Grande Valley sector. Right now, you are alone, in the desert, on the border between the United States and neighboring Mexico. Your job is to stop people, all people, from illegally crossing the border. In your sector, there are many well-known places, called Ports of Entry, where people can legally travel from …

  • Published
    April 25, 2019

    To wall or not to wall

    Randy, your “Remember the Alamo: Walls work” is a telling narrative. History can be a good predictor of the future, but in the case of walls, haven’t we advanced at all since the Alamo? That was 1836 — almost three centuries ago. In the past we also protected our castles with moats; could we settle for some moats instead of your wall? Your “Taylor story” does a good job humanizing the challenges our border patrol …

  • Published
    March 7, 2019

    Protect Maine's vote

    Since 2006, there have been five efforts by Maine’s progressive legislators to trick Mainers into implementing the National Popular Vote and ignoring the Electoral College. The newest bills, LD 418 and LD 816, propose an interstate agreement involving the 50 states and the District of Columbia (Washington, D.C.) to implement the National Popular Vote, which would force us to hand over all of the Electoral College …

  • Published
    March 7, 2019

    National Popular Vote: Right or wrong?

    Paula and I have some agreement here, but we probably disagree on the premises and on the motivation. Starting with where we agree, Paula writes: “Our founders developed the Electoral College to protect each state’s voice. With National Popular Vote legislation, presidential campaigns would concentrate on the larger states and ignore the smaller states, which would upset voters by rendering us irrelevant.” She …

  • Published
    January 1, 2016

    Gun sense

    I used to go bear hunting with an assault rifle. It was .69 caliber and was easily as long as I was tall. It took a huge charge of black powder and the cock, or hammer, held a thick, wide flint. It threw a blinding shower of sparks. The gun was, of course, a Brown Bess, the smoothbore flintlock long arm used by British and some Americans during the Revolutionary War. This gun and other similar firearms were used …

  • Published
    March 10, 2010

    Les Otten’s claims and record

    Marian McCue and John Christie in this week’s article “Risky business: Les Otten and the rise and fall of American Skiing Co.” take Mr. Otten to task for not acknowledging on his Web site that he grew a company that eventually went out of business. They say Mr. Otten is “scrupulously avoiding his record as the founder and chief executive officer of American Skiing Co.” The implication is that Mr. Otten is …

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