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Tom Seymour of Frankfort is a homeowner, gardener, forager, naturalist, Registered Maine Guide, amateur astronomer, magazine and newspaper columnist and book author. His books include "Foraging New England," "Hiking Maine," "Fishing Maine," "Birding Maine," "Nuts & Berries of New England" and "Maine Off The Beaten Path," all by Globe Pequot Press, Guilford, Conn. Tom also wrote "Maine Wildlife," a Maine Sportsman publication, Tom Seymour’s "Maine – A Maine Anthology," iUniverse Press and "Wild Plants of Maine, Hidden World Revealed" and "Forager’s Notebook", all by Just Write Books, Topsham, Maine.

Latest
  • Published
    September 9, 2021

    Loving those French-style green beans

    Tom Seymour of Frankfort is a homeowner, gardener, forager, naturalist, Registered Maine Guide, amateur astronomer, magazine and newspaper columnist, and book author.

  • Published
    August 26, 2021

    Savoring those late crops

    Tom Seymour of Frankfort is a homeowner, gardener, forager, naturalist, Registered Maine Guide, amateur astronomer, magazine and newspaper columnist, and book author.

  • Published
    August 12, 2021

    Look to the fields and roadsides

    It happens every year. Summer perennials lose their luster as the season nears its end.

  • Published
    July 8, 2021

    Imagination is key to garden design

    From The Ground Up: Tom Seymour of Frankfort is a homeowner, gardener, forager, naturalist, Registered Maine Guide, amateur astronomer, magazine and newspaper columnist and book author.

  • Published
    June 3, 2021

    All containers, great and small

    Read any book on container gardening and you’ll see anything that can hold soil will pass for a container. This makes container gardening a wide-open territory, and it encompasses everything from hen-and-chicks growing in a worn-out boot, to elaborate systems of raised beds. They’re all containers. Containers also range from the commercially available kind, such as EarthBoxes, to homemade devices of every …

  • Published
    April 22, 2021

    Got sun?

    Sunshine, direct from Sol and free for the taking, is the key essential ingredient for growing a great garden. If you have lots of direct sunshine, you are in business. But what if you only have limited, direct sun? Not to worry, since there are ways to make the best use of it. My new place has only a small amount of full, direct sun and that means using every means at my disposal to grow as much as possible in …

  • Published
    April 8, 2021

    Cucumbers: a most remarkable vegetable

    A cuke is a cuke is a cuke. Or is it? Cucumbers today come in a wide range of forms and types. Let’s first break it down into two parts. First, we have vining cucumbers, the kind that need to be grown on a trellis or else they will sprawl all over the ground. Sprawling cucumbers invite slugs and other pests to feed on the partially hidden fruits. Growing on a trellis ensures protection from pests and ease of …

  • Published
    March 25, 2021

    March, the in-between time

    Oh, how those warm, sunny days in March beckon us to go outside and begin working on the lawn and garden. However, our choices are limited as to what we can accomplish because March is an in-between time, not really winter but not quite spring. For many of us, the ground remains mostly frozen. Even where the ground has thawed, choices are limited regarding what we might plant with any hope of successful germinatio…

  • Published
    March 11, 2021

    The first spring flower

    The first spring wildflower has already begun blooming. On Feb. 25, I visited a south-facing site where coltsfoot grows and not exactly to my amazement, I found the bright-yellow blooms of coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara in evidence. I visit this site every year when spring fever conjures thoughts of warmer days spent amid plants both domestic and wild. The place is a steep bank, so steep that hardly anything else …

  • Published
    February 25, 2021

    This season, try the artemisias

    Want to lighten up the garden this year? There is no better way to do it than to plant any of the various types of Artemisia. Members of this group are grown for their bright, greenish-white foliage. This, as opposed to plants grown mainly for their blooms, gives artemisias a long display season. Artemisia falls in the Aster family and common names include artemisia and wormwood. Plants overwinter by virtue of …

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