Adventures way Down East

By Sarah E. Reyolds | Jul 06, 2018

We went way Down East to celebrate our fifth wedding anniversary (and 18 years of being together). I had wanted to see Campobello Island for a while, and this turned out to be the occasion for it.

We stayed in Lubec, at a former Coast Guard station that has been converted into lodging, which makes up in ocean view what it lacks in amenities. It was comfortable enough, as vacation accommodations go -- nothing fancy, the kitchen lacked a pair of scissors, the beds were too soft, but all in all, not bad.

We, or rather, I, had a fair amount of angst trying to find a dog-sitter for the four days we would be gone. It seemed the people I tried were either unavailable or too expensive. But, in the end, I discovered we could take our smaller dog, Rosie, with us for just $10 a night. And Maureen's son, Brian, was able to stay in the house with the big dog, for whom we engaged someone to come by and let her out during the day while Brian was at work.

We drove to Lubec in a driving rain pretty much the whole way. Getting out of the car to walk Rosie wasn't much fun. When we arrived, we got everything inside and sat down to research dinner options. I never find it easy to tell from online reviews exactly what a restaurant is like, and I was disappointed in my choice Thursday night of the Lubec Brewing Co. I was expecting a pub and got a hippie vegan joint with not much on the menu I wanted to eat besides pizza. There was a woman with a guitar singing songs from the 1970s into a microphone that was turned up too loud.

I was ready to leave, but Maureen felt we should stay the course, given the pouring rain outside and the difficulty we'd already had finding a place to park. As it turned out, the four-cheese pizza wasn't bad; it's always better to be full than hungry.

The next day, we got some groceries from the local market and had breakfast in, then drove over the bridge to Campobello. The island is lovely, and I enjoyed the tour of the "cottage" once occupied by Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Apparently, at one time, the island was quite the resort for the well-to-do. Nowadays, a big hunk of it is a national park maintained jointly by the United States and Canada. After the house tour, we drove around the island a bit, taking pleasure in the lupine still blooming in late June and views across the Bay of Fundy.

Our second dinner was much better; so much so, that we went back to the Water Street Tavern the last night we were there as well. Maureen declared the scallops "perfect," and I enjoyed tucking into some fork-tender barbecued ribs.

Saturday morning, Maureen slept late, which, along with a doubtful forecast for the afternoon, put the kibosh on our plan to go on a whale watch. Instead, we drove a short distance to West Quoddy Head Light. Both the lighthouse, which is in a state park, and the former Coast Guard station where we were staying are on West Quoddy Head, a tiny little isthmus that sticks out into the Atlantic. As a result, the head often experiences fog when the mainland a mile or two away is perfectly clear. The lighthouse, being at the tip of the head, seems to be particularly prone to fog. The difference in temperature between the grounds of the lighthouse, overlooking the water, and the parking lot, which was just up a small rise, was surprising the day we were there. I was glad to have a corduroy shirt next to the lighthouse.

Despite the fog, we were able to see a couple of different kinds of sea ducks with our binoculars, as they rose the surf and dove for fish. We still haven't found out the names of those birds.

It was fun having Rosie with us; she enjoyed having a toy tossed for her on the deck outside our cabin, and I took several exploring walks around the station with her. She also liked sleeping with us, even though the management had requested no dogs on the beds.

A final discovery was Monica's Chocolates in Lubec; truly a paradise for the chocolate lover. We were treated to samples of a couple of different kinds of confections, all of which are made on the premises. Everything was pre-packaged, rather than being in a case from which customers would choose their own selection. We spent far too much there -- and we've been enjoying it very much.

Comments (0)
If you wish to comment, please login.