Final Captains' Quarters Talk to Highlight Camden Schooners Grace Bailey and Mercantile.


Community Happenings
Online
Captain Jim Sharp
sailpowersteammuseum@gmail.com
207-596-0200
sailpowersteammuseum.org/index.html
May 04, 2021
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Grace Bailey Under Sail

The Sail, Power, and Steam Museum will host the last of their winter speaker series, sharing their mission of celebrating the maritime and industrial heritage of Midcoast Maine and beyond.

“Captains’ Quarters: Stories of the Schooners Grace Bailey and Mercantile” will be held Tuesday, May 4, at 6:30pm.  The talk will take place utilizing the online portal, Zoom.  Registration is required and available on the museum’s website: www.sailpowersteammuseum.org on the “Music and Calendar” tab.

Built in 1882 and restored in 1990, the Grace Bailey is 123 feet overall (81 feet on deck).  An authentic 19th century sailing ship, she has a rich history. This is the same ship that sailed to the West Indies in the Fruit Trade and carried granite to New York City to help build Grand Central Station.  A major restoration was done in 1990; with every effort was made to preserve her historic integrity.  A unique feature of this vessel is the restored 1882 main cabin, complete with hand-carved wood paneling and even a piano.

The Mercantile was built and operated for almost her entire career in this area. A familiar sight in many local ports for more than 100 years, she was built in 1916 and restored in 1989.  A shoal-draft vessel (115 feet overall (80 feet on deck) she was designed to take on and discharge cargo in out-of-the way places, inaccessible to deeper draft vessels. She began sailing out of Camden in 1945 as part of Frank Swift's Maine Windjammer Cruises® fleet.

Join us for an evening of reminiscing about these wonderful vessels as Captain Jim Sharp, co-founder of the Sail, Power, and Steam Museum, is joined by Captains Ray Williamson, Mike Anderson, and Ted Schmitt as they share the history, photos, and stories of these two wonderful vessels.

In the true spirit of our maritime heritage, it is suggested that people “grab a ‘tot’ of rum” (or a cup of tea), settle into the comfort of their own boat or home, fire up the woodstove, and join Captain Sharp and the crew as they share photos and stories of this amazing vessel.  FMI: www.SailPowerSteamMuseum.org.