Journal Files

Importance of town meetings; ice jam below Bucksport; steadfast Journal patrons; angleworms signal spring

Mar 05, 2018

March 3, 1848

Death of John Q. Adams: The venerable ex-president was struck with paralysis on Monday of last week, while in his seat in the House. He was removed to the Speaker’s room, and there continued until Wednesday evening, when he died. He was speechless during all this time. The event, although not wholly unexpected, has actually called forth very general expressions of regret at the loss of an eminent scholar and statesman, who has stood among us as almost the representative of a past age.

Town Meeting: the citizens of Belfast are notified that the town meeting occurs on Monday next. The importance of these local meetings, in which the citizens are called upon to act in matters of immediate concern to themselves and neighbors should not be underrated.

March 2, 1876

Our friends at Bucksport and Winterport are again unfortunate. The late severe weather has caused an ice jam in the river below Bucksport, impenetrable to steamers. The City of Richmond tried it on Friday, but gave up and went east. On Saturday morning the Katahdin endeavored for three hours to force a passage, at the end of which time Capt. Roix became convinced that the task was hopeless. With all the hard work he was unable to reach Sandy Point, and the ice extended, apparently heavy and firm, as far as could be seen. The boat was then backed out, and returned to her wharf in this city.

The publication of the Republican Journal was commenced forty-seven years ago, and though most of the original subscribers have dropped off, there are still some left. On Wednesday, Rufus Littlefield Esq., of Stockton, who subscribed in 1829, and has taken it ever since, came in and paid for the year 1876. Steadfast patrons like those are worth having.

March 2, 1905

Northport News: Miss Mary B. Grant closed a very successful term of ten weeks school at the Cove, Friday, furnished by Mrs. Henrietta Hill White of Brookline, Mass. Mrs. White has paid for maintaining a ten weeks school each year, for seventeen years at a cost of one hundred dollars a year, besides furnishing new seats that cost one hundred and fifty dollars and making other repairs in all amounting to more than two thousand dollars. Truly a magnificent gift. And it is the writer’s wish that ‘sometime, somewhere or somehow’ she will be amply rewarded.

A new fire-proof steel card ledger, constructed by the Jamestown, N.Y., Art Metal Construction Company, was put into the Belfast Savings Bank Feb. 23d. It is the only one of the kind ever built and was made from plans designed by Messrs. W. H. Quimby and W. J. Dorman of the bank. The steel case weighs about one half ton and works on a principle somewhat similar to the roll-top desk.

March 3, 1910

The Read Garage & Machine Co. received two cars Saturday morning: Model E, 30-horse power Maxwell touring car for Mr. Charles Bradbury, and Model A, a 12-horse power Maxwell runabout for demonstration by the company. Judge George E. Johnson and William M. Thayer have placed orders for the latter car.

Two signs of spring were noted Monday: One of Belfast’s prominent attorneys, an ardent fisherman, dug a small quantity of angleworms, and W.E. Hamilton, our florist, began the setting of the small geraniums so popular in the spring gardens.

March 6, 1941

Mrs. James D. Mortimer, president of the Belfast Branch of Bundles for Britain, has received a letter from the Duchess of Leinster, who is executive chairman at headquarters in New York City, acknowledging receipt of the surgical instruments sent from here, Miss Anna R. Kelley, R.N. being chairman of that committee. The duchess writes that the instruments made a fine display, and that they are most welcome, for the factories that have been making such instruments are now working on munitions of war.

Playing at the City Theatre: “Action, Drama, Humor, Romance.” "Rudyard Kipling’s Gunga Din" with Sam Jaffe, Cary Grant, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Victor McLaglen, and Joan Fontaine.

March 4, 1948

‘See our movie and get a fur coat!’ invites William F. Muir, manager of the Colonial Theater. Mr. Muir explains that a group of Belfast’s leading business firms are giving away absolutely free three new mouton lamb fur coats - one person at each of the shows on successive Friday evenings. These coats were specially selected by the Maine Fur Company at the New York style show of 1949 models.

Playing at the Colonial: Susan Hayward, Lee Bowman and Eddie Albert in "Smash-Up" and Tim Holt in Zane Grey’s "Under the Tonto Rim."

 

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